Original Signed Pulp Pin-Up Illustration Painting Woman Bathing Suit 30s

Original Signed Pulp Pin-Up Illustration Painting Woman Bathing Suit 30s
Original Signed Pulp Pin-Up Illustration Painting Woman Bathing Suit 30s
Original Signed Pulp Pin-Up Illustration Painting Woman Bathing Suit 30s
Original Signed Pulp Pin-Up Illustration Painting Woman Bathing Suit 30s
Original Signed Pulp Pin-Up Illustration Painting Woman Bathing Suit 30s
Original Signed Pulp Pin-Up Illustration Painting Woman Bathing Suit 30s
Original Signed Pulp Pin-Up Illustration Painting Woman Bathing Suit 30s

Original Signed Pulp Pin-Up Illustration Painting Woman Bathing Suit 30s
Here is a rare large original signed pin-up art illustration painting of a woman in a bathing suit from the 1930s by. Ralph Pallen Coleman, who did illustrations for the Saturday Evening Post. Liberty, Holland's Magazine, Maclean's, Blue Book, Green Book, Short Stories, Cosmopolitan and Good Housekeeping magazines.

Dimensions: 16 1/2" by 22". Ralph Pallen Coleman (1892 1968) was an American painter and illustrator.

His career spanned more than half a century during which he illustrated stories for many magazines, and later, religious illustrations and paintings which provided images of Christianity to millions of people during the 1950s-1960's. A native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he grew up and lived there throughout his 75 years. Coleman formally got his education at the School of Industrial Art in Philadelphia. However, he never completed those studies.

In 1917 he entered the commercial field due to financial need and joined the commercial art world of periodical publication that was flourishing in Philadelphia at the time. At this point, much of Coleman's work was for newspapers, including the Philadelphia Inquirer and the now defunct North American; for book jackets; and for religious publishing houses. During the First World War he executed a variety of war-related posters and illustrations including his first cover illustration for Literary Digest.

It was a cover in 1917 featuring a doughboy "going over the top" in France. "Going over the top" refers to when a soldier would attempt to cross "no man's land" between two opposing trenches. During World War I he worked in the Marine Camouflage Department where he and several other artists directed the painting of both combat and merchant vessels. "High, Low and Close" was the first story which Ralph Pallen Coleman ever illustrated for The Saturday Evening Post. He delivered the black and white picture to the Post on May 12, 1915.

Subsequently, he did scores of paintings for the Post, then the outstanding magazine in the United States and the flagship publication of Curtis Publishing Co. During the Twenties, magazines and periodicals kept him busy turning out over 100 illustrations a year. He started the decade by illustrating for the popular "pulps" of the period. By the mid-twenties he was a regular contributor to Liberty, Holland's Magazine, Maclean's, Blue Book, Green Book and Short Stories magazines. His illustrations captured the spirit of the times, most notably in 1922 when he was commissioned to do the illustrations for the serial "Flaming Youth, " a phrase that became the symbol of that gay and gaudy decade.

In 1924, Coleman completed 178 illustrations for various publications. But he would have to wait until the Depression Years to be a regular in the "big leagues" of Curtis, Crowell-Collier and Hearst Publishing Companies. By the end of the decade, he had become a regular contributor to Cosmopolitan, the flagship magazine of the Hearst magazine empire, and its sister publication, Good Housekeeping.

During the Thirties, Ralph Pallen Coleman's career flourished with assignments to illustrate stories for W. Somerset Maugham, Louis Bromfield, F.

Scott Fitzgerald, and Booth Tarkington, Sir Phillip Gibbs, Rex Beach, Clarence Buddington Kelland, and Edison Marshall. Much to his surprise, he began receiving assignments from the Post's archrival, Colliers. During the same week, Coleman had illustrations running in both the Post and Colliers. It was during this period that he began to use his brush to present his viewers with exotic scenes of faraway places they would never be able to visit in person.

Quickly, he became one of the most sought-after illustrators of exotic stories laid in the South Seas, the Far East and Africa. Using extensive photographic research provided by magazines like National Geographic, the artist turned out a body of work depicting pith-helmeted explorers, bare-breasted natives, lithe jungle cats native to a Tropicana that he personally had never visited. Ralph Pallen Coleman, a lifelong Presbyterian was an elder and trustee at Grace Presbyterian Church in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania.

Religious images were always very powerful messages for him and he was able to integrate this passion into his professional career. His first commission as an illustrator was for a drawing at the request of the American Sunday School Union in 1914.

Even during the Twenties and Thirties, when his output was primarily for the popular magazines, Coleman turned out a steady, if limited, stream of religious and Biblical paintings for Providence Lithograph Co. And various denominational publishing houses. But it was not until the 1940s when he was well into middle age, that Coleman embarked on a virtually new career that of Biblical and religious artist, producing more than 400 religious paintings and murals. In his later years after 1942, Coleman was able to use his illustrating skills to present a realistic kaleidoscope of hundreds of Biblical illustrations, culminating in the most complete series of paintings on the life of Christ ever done by a contemporary artist. One of this most widely distributed works, "The Eternal Christ, " was painted in 1942.

The painting was reproduced and several million copies were distributed to both civilians and servicemen during World War II. With the advent of actual photography being able to be reproduced in the periodicals of the day, the "slick" magazine illustrator had to turn his talents primarily to paintings of a religious or Biblical nature. From his continued study of religious illustrations from the past, he was able to develop his own strong images of how Jesus might have looked. These are seen in Coleman's portrayals of the Savior, a portrayal that unites an essential spirituality with the warm humanity of a strong and vigorous young man. There is a remarkable consistency to Coleman's conception of Christ in the 17 paintings for Donald F.

Irvin's "Life of Jesus" in 1951, the 57 paintings for "The Way, The Truth and The Life" and the 42 illustrations for Hurlbut's Story of the Bible. In his later years, Mr. Coleman designed a series of stained glass windows on the life of Christ for Grace Presbyterian Church and lectured extensively in the Philadelphia area showing slides of his paintings.

Colemans work can still be viewed in many Philadelphia area venues. His commissioned works set the tone for the Whitemarsh Park chapel. His work in stained glass adorns the Grace Presbyterian Church in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania. A collection of his later work and papers resides in the Special Collections Research Center at the Syracuse University. The item "Original Signed Pulp Pin-Up Illustration Painting Woman Bathing Suit 30s" is in sale since Sunday, January 26, 2020.

This item is in the category "Art\Paintings". The seller is "pengang" and is located in Marietta, Georgia.

This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Dominican republic, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, El salvador, Honduras, Jamaica, Antigua and barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Montserrat, Turks and caicos islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Viet nam, Uruguay, Russian federation.


Original Signed Pulp Pin-Up Illustration Painting Woman Bathing Suit 30s