C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed

C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed
C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed
C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed
C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed
C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed
C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed
C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed
C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed
C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed
C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed
C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed
C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed

C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post. Signed

For sale is one of two spectacular original illustration drawings by arguably the best sporting and outdoorsman illustration artist of the first half of the 20th century Lynn Bogue Hunt (1878 - 1960). Please see our store for the other work by Hunt.

This drawing was created as an illustration for The Saturday Evening Post newspaper. From the 1920s to the 1960s, it was one of the most widely circulated and influential magazines for the American middle class, with fiction, non-fiction, cartoons and original illustration art by some of Americas greatest illustrators and artists including Norman Rockwell. This features an original charcoal drawing of what looks like performing circus elephants disembarking off of a traveling circus train to drink bath and frolic in the water. The main elephant is named Frieda according to a type written caption paper slip attached to the work.

The paper is worn but one can make out Frieda was afraid of the deep water. The remaining wording is hard to read as the paper is tattered somewhat.

The work is signed by the artist in the Lower right corner. Owners of The Saturday Evening Post.

That label is firmly attached but fraying and should be preserved under clear sheet. Executed on Whatmans Paper Board. The image being in fine condition. An original publishers caption strip attached to surface.

The paperboard support having edge tears and old hanging pin holes. Please see all close up pictures for Condition. Board - 17 1/2 x 30. Image size - 15 1/2 x 27 3/4. Lynn Bogue Hunt (1878 - 1960).

Angler, hunter, and above all artist, Lynn Bogue Hunt was the most popular and prolific outdoor illustrator in mid-20th century America. He painted a record 106 covers for Field & Stream in addition to numerous covers for other publications; illustrated dozens of books on waterfowling, upland bird hunting, and saltwater fishing (not coincidentally, his three main interests as a sportsman); and published several portfolios of his paintings to enormous acclaim.

He was a bon vivant, too. Perpetually tanned and angularly handsome, he cut a dashing figure in any company. He was as comfortable twisting a lemon peel into a martini at a poolside cocktail party as he was rigging a complicated trolling bait on the deck of a pitching sport fisherman.

Hunt fished, hunted, and hobnobbed with the most famous outdoorsmen of his day: Van Campen Heilner, S. Kip Farrington, Ray Holland, Zane Grey, and, oh yeah, that Hemingway guy. Hunt even did a painting of a semi-tame quail that Hemingway and his third wife, Martha Gellhorn, kept at Finca Vigia, the home in Cuba that looms so massively in the Hemingway mythology. Born in Honeoye Falls, New York, (near Rochester) in 1878, Lynn Bogue Hunt mostly grew up in Albion, Michigan. With the support and encouragement of his mother, whod left Hunts rainbow-chasing dad back in New York, he kept a menagerie of wild pets; spent as much time as he could hunting, observing nature, and simply tramping around outdoors; learned taxidermy when he was in his teens; and sketched constantly from the time he was a little boy.

While still in high school he took painting lessons from a professor at Albion College, and in 1897, while a student at Albion himself, he made his debut on the national stage with A King of Game Birds, a ruffed grouse story for Sports Afield that he both wrote and illustrated. In 1903, after honing his skills for three years as a staff artist at the Detroit Free Press, Hunt moved to New York City, where he hung out his shingle as a freelance illustrator and never looked back. In addition to magazine illustration, he did all kinds of advertising workcalendars, posters, catalog covers, you name it. A signal event in Hunts career came in 1917, the year he turned 39.

Thats when DuPont published Our American Game Birds, a magnificent portfolio of 18 full-color Hunt reproductions of upland gamebirds, shorebirds, and waterfowl. It became wildly popular with sportsmen, putting Hunt on the map and firmly establishing him as the gamebird artist of his time. Still, it wasnt until 1924, when he began his remarkable run at Field & Stream, that he truly arrived. Every year from 1924 through 1947 Hunt did as many as seven and never fewer than two covers for F&S. He also provided sketches and line drawings, literally by the hundreds, to illustrate various articles for the magazine. For example, Hunt did the original drawings that accompanied one of Gordon MacQuarries best-loved stories, the duck-hunting yarn, The Little Flight.

He wrote for F&S on occasion, too, including a memorable account of fishing for striped bass in the crashing surf off Montauk Point called Striped Bass and Ol Devil Sea. In the words of longtime F&SEditor David E. Petzal: Of all our cover artists, the most famous and arguably the most successful was Lynn Bogue Hunt. Hunt would submit a watercolor rough of a cover to the editor and, when it was approved, would redo it in oil.

Like Audubon, Hunt shot and mounted many of the birds and mammals he painted. He relied on friends who brought him photos of their adventures and was himself an active hunter and fisherman.

Adds Petzal: What made Hunt stand out among so many gifted peers? George Reiger, an authority on Hunt, puts it this way: His subjects were simply more real. How do you paint something alive? Hunt painted his final cover for Field & Stream in 1951, cleaned his brushes for the last time in 1953, and lived in semi-seclusion at his home in western Long Island until his death, at the age of 82, in 1960. The item "C1940s Original Lynn Bogue Hunt Illustration For Saturday Evening Post.

Signed" is in sale since Saturday, February 16, 2019. This item is in the category "Art\Art Drawings". The seller is "upstatetreasures14" and is located in Kingston, New York. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Colombia, Panama, Jamaica, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Viet nam, Uruguay, Chile.